Musical Notes Tune No. / NoteMP3 Music ClipPhoto(s)
TUNE 01-Bonnie Mac: is a 2 part 2/4 Hornpipe which I first heard played back in the mid 1970’s by the 400 Squadron R.C.F.A. Pipes and Drums, which was under the direction of Pipe Major MWO Terry Cleland. It caught my fancy and through ear to chanter creativity I wrote out this wee tune in hand script musical notations. As bagpipe music writing software emerged I then re-wrote the tune in Bagpipe Music Writer format.

I do not know the origin or original composer of this fine piece of music. So, I have designated it to be Traditional. My arrangement is less embellished that what the original composition or even the setting that Pipe Major Cleland’s 400 Squadron Pipes and Drums may have been playing. As with many of my arrangements, I often arrange music for the lower grade pipe bands.

As for myself, I often play this tune with a few more embellishments when I play it, but this setting is well suited for the lower grade bands. The tune MIDI is at the 90 bpm, but it also could be played at the 80 bpm for a lower grade band for more clarity.
No photo available at this time
TUNE 02-The Pipers Glass: is a 2 part Reel which I first played back in the mid late 1960’s and early 1970’s when I was playing with the 48th Highlanders of Canada Pipes and Drums. The tune was part of one of our Grade 1 medley selections. The Pipe Major of the competition band at the time was MWO Reay MacKay who eventually took over the band from Pipe Major Ross Stewart in 1975.

I do not know the origin or original composer of this fine piece of music. However, it is also know by various names such as The Connacht Rangers, Down the Broom, The Humours of Mackin, and Fermoy Lasses or The Fermoy Lasses or The Fermoy Lassies. Fermoy Lasses is definitely this tune, but when played by banjo or fiddle it tends to be in a lower key and may not sound as sweet at when played on the great highland bagpipe. The other named tunes also have the same tempo and style and could be this tune or another tune that is very similar to this tune. So, I have designated it to be Traditional. My arrangement is less embellished that what the original composition or even the setting that Pipe Major MacKay’s may have been playing. As with many of my arrangements, I often arrange music for the lower grade pipe bands.

As for myself, I often play this tune with a few more embellishments when I play it (the Reay MacKay arrangement) but this setting is well suited for the lower grade bands. The tune MIDI is at the 90 bpm, but it also could be played at the 80 bpm for a lower grade band for more clarity.

As for the tune name The Pipers Glass, well, I don’t know how it came by that particular name. However, often a Piper after piping in dignitaries or the Commanding Officer of a regiment the Commanding Officer may toast the Piper or the Dignitary. Regimental toasts are often done using a Quach Cup (see my pipe composition “The Quach Cup” a Reel found in Book 1 tune 41b. The often a toast is given using the traditional Shot Glass, see my pipe composition The Shot Glass which is a 6/8 Jig found in Book 1 tune 53b. Then again it could be Sniffing Glass, after all most pipers seem to enjoy Scotch or Irish whiskey. As for myself, I’m a Rum and Coke man myself, that’s why I wrote a Calypso Style Reel called The Rum O’clock Reel which is also found in Book 1 tune 46. Then gain it could be a simple glass, fancy or not fancy at all. I don’t really think it matters to Pipers what kind of Glass they may be toasting with or drinking some fine Scotch or Irish whiskey, in fact, they might simply drink it right from the bottle.

Anyway, this is nice lively wee 2 Part reel by whatever name you prefer to call it by.
No photo available at this time