Musical Notes Tune No. / NoteMP3 Music ClipPhoto(s)
TUNE 01 – ST. KITTS REEL: is a 4 part Calypso Reel I composed in January 2017. It is named after the Islands of St. Kitts-Nevis in the Caribbean and area where Calypso is celebrated along with other music styles each year. I felt St. Kitts Reel sounded better than The St. Kitts-Nevis Reel or The Nevis Reel. The first Europeans to see and name the islands were the Spanish under Christopher Columbus, who sighted the islands in 1493 during his second voyage. He named Saint Kitts Sant Jago (Saint James). However, misinterpretations of maps by subsequent Spanish explorers led Saint Kitts to be named San Cristobal (Saint Christopher), a name originally applied to Saba twenty miles north. Nevis was named "Nuestra Señora de las Nieves", or "Our Lady of the Snows", because the wreath of white clouds that usually covers the top of its volcanic peak reminded the Spaniards of the ancient Catholic miracle Our Lady of the Snows. The name Christopher is often short formed as a nickname “KIT or KITT” so; St. Kitts is the use of the nickname of Christopher, in this case St. Christopher.
View of a St. Kitts Beach
Map of St. Kitts
Map of St. Kitts and Nivis Islands
TUNE 02 –CAPTAIN KILKENNY - THE WOLFHOUND (a.k.a. Captain Kilkenny or The Wolfhound): is a 4 part Jig I composed in February 2017. It seemed to have an Irish flavour to it, so I was looking something that was Irish that could be the title. The Irish Wolfhound breed of dog came to mind. I dropped the word IRISH from the title, as it just didn’t seem to have the correct ring to it. I was Pipe Major of the 25 Toronto Service Battalion Pipes and Drums in the 1980’s. In mid-1960’s the Irish Regiment of Canada based in Toronto, nicknamed The Toronto Irish Regiment was put to nil strength and about a month later it was amalgamated with a regiment in Sudbury, Ontario and titled the 2nd Battalion Irish Regiment of Canada. The Pipes and Drums however no longer existed technically but continued to play together under the auspices of the regimental association based in Toronto. In 1969 and 1970 a new unit titled the Toronto Service Battalion came into being and required a band. The members of the former Irish Regiment of Canada formed the new Toronto Service Battalion Pipes and Drums under the leadership of Pipe Major Bill Service with the majority of the members being form Irish Regiment of Canada Pipers and Drummers. When I took over the band there were still a number of the original members of the band still with the band. A former Irish Regiment of Canada Pipe Major George Pate was piper I had met a number of times. Both George and other members of the band used to discuss the good old days with the Irish Regiment of Canada. George and two others were pipers with the Irish Regiment during WWII and often suggest that the Toronto Service Battalion should have a mascot and an Irish Wolfhound would be a good choice. They talked about the Irish Regiment of Canada’s mascot which as an Irish Wolfhound named “Captain Kilkenny”. Though I never met this mascot, as it passed away during WWII in 1941, it was held in high esteem and regard. I have titled the tune “Captain Kilkenny – The Wolfhound” in remembrance of some of the stories I heard about ‘Captain Kilkenny” from the likes of George Pate, Ken Maxell and Eddie McClure. So, the main reason for the title of the tune was because of a rather famous Irish Wolfhound and the stories I heard about its escapades.
Irish Regiment of Canada (Toronto Irish) lead by regimental mascot "Captain Kilkenny" and Irish Wolfound.
Captain Kilkenny leading the Irish Regiment of Canada followed by the Pipes and Drums.
Irish Regiment of Canada (Toronto) Mascot - Captain Kilkenny
TUNE 03 –HANDS ACROSS THE DIVIDE (a.k.a. Craigavon Bridge): is a 4 part 2/4 Hornpipe I composed in March 2017. As you enter the city of Derry (Londonderry, Northern Ireland) across Craigavon Bridge, the first thing you see is the Hands Across the Divide monument. This striking bronze sculpture of two men reaching out to each other symbolizes the spirit of reconciliation and hope for the future; it was unveiled in 1992, 20 years after Bloody Sunday.

The town is built on both sides of the banks of the River Foyle. Growing up, the Catholics traditionally lived on one side and the Protestants on the other. If you grew up during The Troubles, a time when you were all too often labelled by your religion, where you lived, what school you went to, and what your surname was. Calling the town “Derry” or “Londonderry” immediately defined what side of the divide you were on.

I felt this particular hornpipe had a bit of a nice lift to it and I can picture two groups marching together hand in hand behind two pipe bands, to meet on the bridge to join together as one, not defined by where they lived or what their religious beliefs. So, I thought about the statue which was one of the first things you sighted when crossing into the city on the Craigavon Bridge, and chose HANDS ACROSS THE DIVIDE as the title of the tune.
Hands Across the Divide Statue - Derry (Londonderry), Northern Ireland
Hands Across the Divide - Derry (Londonderry) Northern ireland
Hand Across the Divide - Town of Derry (Londonderry) Northern Ireland
Hands Across the Divide Statue with Craigavon Bridge in background - Derry (Londonerry) Northern Ireland
TUNE 04 – Waltzing Cross Canada (open - 1st MP3 Clip and held - 2nd MP3 clip versions): is a quick waltz that I composed. The tune was originally composed as the “open” version, which I prefer. However, some may prefer the “held” version. The difference between the two, it that the various 5 note phrases which include a 3 note run is held on the first of the 5 notes. You will see this in the 2nd bar and 6th bar of the first part and the 3rd bar and 7th bar of the second part and the 2nd bar of the second time over the second part.

As I did not have any name for this particular waltz and it was not necessarily in the style of a Celtic (Irish or Scottish) sound, it seemed to have more of a North American folk or country or blue grass sound. Then I saw an ad on Television about Canada’s 150th’s sesquicentennial celebrations which was promoting travelling across Canada to celebrate our 150th. I was part of a Canadian Forces Tattoo that travelled across Canada in1967 during Canada’s Centennial Celebrations. Though I am no longer part of the Canadian Forces and will not be participating in any of the planned events at this time, I thought, well if you’re going to travel across Canada why not WALTZ across. So I came up with the title WALTZING CROSS CANADA for this tune and it would be a lovely way of celebrating Canada’s 150th Sesquicentennial, by waltzing across this great land of a truly great nation. This particular tune was composed on April 10, 2017 a few months before the Official 150th celebrations.
Canada's 150th Anniversary Celebration Logo
St. John's Newfoundland
View of Icebergs and Whales off Labrador
Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) Musical Ride at Charlottetown Prince Edward Island (PEI)
Peggy's Cover Nova Scotia
Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia
St. Ann's Cape Breton Island - The Gaelic College
Bay of Fundy-Hopewell Rocks - New Burnswick
Quebec City at Night - Quebec
Toronto's CN Tower - Ontario
Train snaking it's way through Northern Ontario
Riding Mountain National Park - Manitoba
Buffalo grazing on the Saskatchewan Plains - Saskatchewan
Cascade Mountain - Banff Alberta
Cox Bay Beach - Tofino - British Columbia
Beautiful - British Columbia
Stanley Park Totem Poles - British Columbia
Whistler - British Columbia
Yukon Territory
North West Territory
Yellowknife - Northern Lights - Aurora Borealis - Land of the Midnight Sun - North West Territory
Nunavut
Frobisher Bay Nunavit
Modern Village Nunavit
Baker Lake Igloo Nunavit
Road sign - ROAD TO NOWHERE - Nunavit
People of Nunavit
Traditional Dress for Women in Nunavit
Parliament Building - Ottawa - Northern Lights Show - Canada Day
UH OH - OH CANADA
TUNE 05 – The Steeplechase Gallop: is a 6/8 Jig I composed in a tempo that reminded me of an Irish Steeplechase Race I watched on an educational television channel. As I watched the horses and riders race around the course jumping over various obstacles I felt it seemed to be something like an Irish Jig they were doing. So, based on the pace set by the rider with their horse, they tended to speed up and slow a wee bit before their jump over a steeple or water area. The tune was composed in the form of an Irish Jig with a tempo that feels like a chase / gallop and the name of the tune them became The Steeplechase Gallop or simply Steeplechase Gallop. Tune was composed on April 20, 2017.


The steeplechase originated in Ireland in the 18th century as an analogue to cross-country thoroughbred horse races which went from church steeple to church steeple, hence "steeplechase". The first steeplechase is said to have been the result of a wager in 1752 between Cornelius O'Callaghan and Edmund Blake, racing four miles (6.4 km) cross-country from Buttevant Church (St. Mary’s) to St. Leger (now known as St. Mary’s) Church in Doneraile, in Cork, Ireland.
Steeple Chase


Steeple Chase


Steeple Chase


Steeple Chase - Champion Horse "Red Rum"


Church from which first Steeplechase Race in the 1800's started - St.Mary's in Betternal, Cork, Ireland


The church the first Steeple Race in the 1800's ended - St. Ledger (now known also as St. Maries in Doneraile, Cork, Ireland
TUNE 06 – The Invictus March: is a 4 Part 4/4 March I composed to honour those who have meet insurmountable challenges in their lives and proved to be unconquerable or undefeated in life and are invincible against those trials and approbations that come into their path during their lifetime. I had composed this tune and felt the name The Invictus March fit well with the melody and style of the tune. Also, I chose the title to also honour all those who participated in the Invictus Games in the past and those who will do so in the future.
Invictus - Poem by William Ernest Henley
Invictus Games Foundation Logo
William Ernest Henly
2016 Invictus Games
Invictus Games - Silver - Gold - Bronze Medals
Invictus Games Athletes
TUNE 07-The Thistle on the Moor: is a 3 Part Strathspey. I didn’t have a name for this tune for a while, but after listening to its style and composition I saw in my mind a dancer, dancing a strathspey on the Highland Moors near some Thistle’s. I remember many years ago, Pipe Major Archie Dewar told me, when playing a Strathspey, imagine in your mind you can see the dancer, dancing the tune and keep in tempo with their steps, jumps or leaps. I do that when playing strathspeys as well as reels and jigs. I also try to imagine a dancer dancing to the tune I am composing as well.
Thistles on Culloden Moor
Thistle on Culloden Moor
At Thistle
Thistle
TUNE 08-Islays’ Jig: is a 4 part 6/8 Jig I composed. The reason it is named Islay’s Jig is a bit of lengthy story. Suffice to say, to those that haven’t read about the fact I was adopted and that after finding out I was adopted and getting information about my biological family, I had to prove who my mother was after a friend from public school whose wife and mother-in-law came from the town, Dundalk, Grey County, Ontario where my grandparents had a farm and knew the family, mentioned who my mother and father possibly were, because the mother she named was not the mother who I was told was my mother. This occurred in 2015 and within six month of internet searches, building a family tree, ancestry research and the use of Facebook, I not only proved who my biological mother was, I discovered a lot of information about my maternal family, that they were of Irish descent (Northern Ireland) through my great great grandfather and of Scottish decent (Perthshire, Scotland) through my great great grandmother and her parents. My birth surname was Agnew from my great great grandfather’s line the Agnew’s of County Antrim, Northern Ireland. My great great grandmother was a Fleming, her father’s surname and Stewart, her mother’s surname and the family from Logeraite, Perthshire, Scotland. Actually I have recently taken a DNA test to search for my biological father’s family and also one to search in general to locate family. These tests show my ethnic heritage is primarily from Northern Ireland (Ulster areas of bother the North East, County Antrim and North West, County Donegal) and a strong relationship through the Irish Agnew’s to the O’Ghimn’s who were the hereditary poets of the O’Neill’s of Clannaboy, Antrim, Northern Ireland. Also, shown is a strong connection to the Scottish area of Perthshire. Both bang on with family information that I have uncovered through various documents and sources.

When researching my family history I did discover that the Agnew’s identified in censuses as being of Irish heritage. So, now we come to the name of this tune “Islay’s Jig”.

First let me explain that during my family research through the use of internet searches, family tree building, family research search engines and various documents that I received from the government and through Facebook, I by sheer luck or divine intervention after about six months of research discovered proof of who my mother was, who she eventually married (through his obituary), that of seven children he had, there were four children he had with my mother, three of whom are still living and one had passed away in 2014. I found my mother’s grave and through Facebook found various cousins as well as connected with the help of one cousin who knew about me being born and adopted as an infant, I have managed to also connect with the three surviving siblings I have and found a photo of the family (my mother’s husband, the four children and the first and only picture I have seen of my mother which was taken when the family was visiting from Toronto with relatives in Nova Scotia three months before her passing). That picture clinched who my mother had married and who my siblings were and this came via the use of Facebook.

So, I was officiating and piping for a wedding in the town of Flesherton on May 13th, 2017. The tune name “Islay’s Jig” is named after my aunt Isaly Marie Livingston (nee Agnew) who is a younger sister of my mother. She was informed by one of the cousins that I had reconnected with the family in December 2016, just prior to Christmas. It was suggest I might want to contact her as she was the family historian. So, since Flesherton was the next town north of Dundalk, and my aunt Islay still lived in Dundalk area, I invited her to meet with my wife and I for dinner. She suggested that one of my uncles and his wife would like to come along. This particular uncle and I are about the same age and I was told by my adoptive mother we used to visit my grandparents farm when I was growing up and used to play with a young boy on the farm. This uncle was that young boy. So we meet and had dinner, shared stories and had a great reunion. I found that my aunt was still very active, out and about all the time, volunteering, etc. and had a very lively step to her. So, being the first of my biological relatives to actually meet after reconnecting with the family I thought I might write a tune. I decided an Irish style 6/8 Jig would be in keeping with my aunt’s lively nature. So, I composed the tune and titled it “Islay’s Jig”.

Some may think that the tune was named after the Isle, Island of Islay on the West Coast of Scotland. Well, in a sense it is. I expect that my aunt’s first name was derived from that Scottish island. In fact, most of my aunts and uncles had given names that were of a Scottish origin. Since the family identified as Irish this might seem to be a bit confusing. However, many of my aunts and uncles have given name passed down through the various family members. Family names so to speak. In fact, most of them tend to go back in time to my great great grandmother’s family who were of Scottish heritage. So, the tune “Islay’s Jig” is an Irish sounding Jig for lady of Irish descent with some Scottish origin given names. So, now you are likely more confused that if I simply stated the tune was names after my aunt Islay Marie Agnew. There are other tunes named after members of the family or things that have something to do with the family. Agnew’s Hill, Lochnaw Castle, Maggie’s Prayer, Dreamtime for Maggie, Maggie’s Fancy, Katie MacGregor (one of my earlier compositions), The Old Girl, The Blue Eyed Shepherd, Dundalk and The Agnew-Macleod Waltz (titled after the surname of my mother “Agnew” and the man she eventually married “MacLeod”. I am sure the future will see more tunes named after family members or things associated with the family. You can read about how these tunes got their titles in other areas of Musical Notes and also listen to them using the MP3 clips provided on the site.
No photo available at this time
TUNE 09-Róisín Dubh (a.k.a. The Little Black Rose): is a 3 Part Strathspey. Not often are their Irish style music that are Strathspey’s. The Irish tended to be more JIG and REEL styled dances. Well, portions of this tune have an Irish flavour (especially the concluding 3rd part). The title is Irish / Ulster Scot’s Gaelic. If in the Republic of Ireland the pronunciation of the Gaelic is Ro-sheen Dove while the Northern Ireland folks would say Ro-sheen Doo, “Doo” being more Ulster Scots, Scottish form of Gaelic pronunciation. The Republic of Ireland’s “Dove” would sound like DOOVE.

There is an old Irish Political song titled Róisín Dubh a.k.a. My Dark Rosaleen. The Gaelic translates into the English phrase Little Black Rose or My Little Black Rose. The Irish Gaelic spoken in the Republic of Ireland and some parts of Northern Ireland’s province of Ulster. While other parts of the province of Ulster use Ulster Scots Gaelic which is a form of both the old Irish Gaelic influence by the Gallowglass / Ulster Scots from the Ulster Plantations over the years by the English and Scots. The two cultures merged as did the language with various overlaps. Ulster Scot’s Gaelic though similar to the Scottish Gaelic is more akin to the Irish Gaelic. The Old Irish Gaelic Language song Róisín Dubh was supposedly created in the 16th Century by the Irish Soldier’s camps of Red Hugh O’Donnell. The Black Rose or Róisín Dubh was a metaphor for Ireland.

While the Rose is more widely recognized as a symbol of England. Remember after HRH Princess Diana died, Sir Elton John change words in his song “A Candle in the Wind” from “Goodbye Norma Jeane” in the original lyrics which were referring to Marilyn Monroe’s actual original birth name Norma Jeane Mortenson (later baptized Norma Jeanes Baker to “Goodbye England’s Rose” which referred to HRH Princess Diana who had recently passed away in 1997. The Rose, especially the Black Rose was used in the last century or so, as a code word for Ireland, when English Law prohibited a direct references to Ireland as a nation.

The Rose in various colours, along with of course the Green Irish Shamrock are two major symbols of Ireland. The Rose is used in many instances in Ireland. In song, such as My Wild Irish Rose by Chauncey Olcott (which was also the title of a 1947 movie, which popularised the term. There are many pubs and even a brand of Irish whiskey known by the name Wild Irish Rose. Then there is the song The Rose of Tralee, which in the song lyrics refers to a girl named Mary. In poetry Joseph Mary Plunkett’s “I See the Blood Upon the Rose” is in reference the crucifixion of Jesus of Nazareth. The Druids wore Long Black and Red Robes with a Black Rose. There is also a Limerick called “The Little Black Rose” about the “Black Rose” turning “Red” in June. The famous Irish Poet William Butler Yates referred to Roses in many of his poems. One poem by Thomas Moore, Tis the Last Rose of Summer, is a metaphor of the Last Rose, the one left to carry on when a loved one passes on. It is also the popular title of a Song. Another song by Irish Singer Tommy Makem which he made popular is the song “Red is the Rose”. The lyrics of the song being Irish are however sung to the Scottish tune Loch Lomond. In Theatre, Sean O’Casey’s lesser known play “Red Roses for Me” includes the poem/song by the same title and is about 1913 labour disputes and turmoil of Dublin. of In Northern Ireland it is a connection between the Northern Irish of Ulster with the British. While in other parts of Ireland the Rose is often reference.

This tune could be used to reflect similar activities that the Scottish Clans would use following a battle. The Scottish Clansmen would Dance as Strathspey and also Reels, following a successful battle. The Irish Clans would likely have danced a Reel or Jig of some kind as Strathspey dancing was not prevalent in any part of Ireland. So, I thought why not write an Irish style Strathspey.
Roisin Dubh Pub (The Black Rose)
A Black Rose
Sinead O'Connor Art Work re Roisin Dubh (The Little Black Rose)
TUNE 10-Jimmy Cox, Master Piper: is a 4 part 4/4 March I composed as a commissioned piece of music requested by the Daughter of the late Pipe Major Hugh McWhinnie, Megan McWhinnie-Crouse. Megan contacted me because I had composed a Hornpipe which I named after her father Hugh, at the time of his passing in 2013. It is found in Book 1 of my publications and Musical Notes. Jimmy Cox was a piper and long-time friend and buddy of Hugh’s and played in several Pipe Bands together. This tune is a gift from Megan to Jimmy to celebrate his 90th Birthday on June 17th, 2017.
Jimmy Cox, Master Piper
TUNE 11-Linda Lang: is a 4 part 6/8 March I composed as a birthday gift for Linda’s birthday which is on June 30th. I completed this tune on June 30th, 2017.

Linda is a piper with the 48th Highlanders of Canada Pipes and Drums and is married Pipe Major MWO Iain W. Lang CD who is the Pipe Major of the 48th Highlanders of Canada. Linda is the former Linda Copeland, daughter of John Copeland. Linda at one time was a Highland Dancer and is a former piper with the Air Command Pipes and Drums (RCAF) in Ottawa.

I have known Linda for several years now and thought that a tune was in order to celebrate her birthday this year. I have composed tunes for other pipers in the 48th Highlanders, which are found on this site, in both BOOK ONE and BOOK TWO including a 4/4 March for her husband titled Pipe Major MWO Iain W. Lang CD which is also found on this web site in BOOK TWO-PART ONE, PAGE 22.

I was a piper with the 48th Highlanders of Canada and first me the Lang family through Iain’s father Jim Lang. I had met Iain as a young piper through his father when both Jim and Iain were playing with the Peel Regional Police Pipe Band (Jim used to ask me to tune Iain’s pipes before he went on to the board to compete in the solo competitions). I eventually met Iain and Linda at some of the 48th Highlanders of Canada Pipes and Drums Association meetings and had the opportunity to play with both Iain and Linda on various events that the 48th Highlanders and The Toronto Scottish Regiment Pipes and Drums were participating in when I was Pipe Major of the Toronto Scottish.
Piper Linda Lang - 48th Highlanders of Canada Pipes and Drums
Piper Linda Lang - Air Command Pipes and Drums (RCAF) - Ottawa
Piper Linda Lang-48th Highlanders of Canada Pipes and Drums
Pipe Major MWO Iain Lang CD and wife Piper Linda Lang - 48th Highlanders of Canada Pipes and Drums
TUNE 12-Wee Diana MacLeod: is a 2 part 6/8 Jig I composed as a birthday gift for Diana’s birthday. However, it was also a very special occasion for Diana, her older Sister Debra and older brother Joseph and myself.

The VERY SPECIAL OCCASION was held from Friday, August 4th, 2017 through August 7th, 2017. The OCCASION was the first meeting of Diana, Debra and Joseph with their older brother Ken.

I was born and then adopted prior to our mother Doreen Lola Agnew marrying Joseph Francis MacLeod. My mother and her husband Joseph had four children David Robert MacLeod, Debra MacLeod (married name O’Connor), Joseph MacLeod and Diana MacLeod.

In December 2015, Ken found three of his four siblings’; unfortunately David Robert MacLeod had passed away in July 2014.

Ken chose to mark the occasion by composing five new 6/8 jigs. Wee Diana MacLeod being one of them. One jig for each of the children of their mother Doreen. The other four are Joey MacLeod, Debra O’s Jiggity Jig, David Robert MacLeod and Caioneach (Cináed) Brian O'Gnimh (the Irish Gaelic name of the composer).

The Agnew family are originally from County Antrim, Northern Ireland. However, the great great Grandfather James Agnew married Jessie Janet Fleming of Perthshire, Scotland. Joseph Francis MacLeod’s family is from Nova Scotia and traces back to Scotland.

So it seemed fitting to compose some pipe tunes to mark this historic and important occasion. Also, Diana came up on the short side of tallness being the shortest member of the siblings so “WEE DIANA” seemed to be appropriate.

Also, Ken, Joe, Debra and our mother all share a birthday in August. David was May and Diana delayed her birth so she was guaranteed a big party the night of her birthday, since she was born December 31st, New Year’s Eve.
No photo available at this time
TUNE 13-Joey MacLeod: is a 2 part 6/8 Jig I composed as a birthday gift for Joe’s birthday. However, it was also a very special occasion for Joe, his older Sister Debra and younger sister Diana and myself.

The VERY SPECIAL OCCASION was held from Friday, August 4th, 2017 through August 7th, 2017. The OCCASION was the first meeting of Joseph, Debra and Diana with their older brother Ken.

I was born and then adopted prior to our mother Doreen Lola Agnew marrying Joseph Francis MacLeod. My mother and her husband Joseph had four children David Robert MacLeod, Debra MacLeod (married name O’Connor), Joseph MacLeod and Diana MacLeod.

In December 2015, Ken found three of his four siblings’; unfortunately David Robert MacLeod had passed away in July 2014.

Ken chose to mark the occasion by composing five new 6/8 jigs. Joey MacLeod being one of them. One jig for each of the children of their mother Doreen. The other four are Wee Diana MacLeod, Debra O’s Jiggity Jig, David Robert MacLeod and Caioneach (Cináed) Brian O'Gnimh (the Irish Gaelic name of the composer).

The Agnew family are originally from County Antrim, Northern Ireland. However, the great great Grandfather James Agnew married Jessie Janet Fleming of Perthshire, Scotland. Joseph Francis MacLeod’s family is from Nova Scotia and traces back to Scotland.

So it seemed fitting to compose some pipe tunes to mark this historic and important occasion. Also, the family tends to call Joseph, Joey rather than Joe.

Also, Ken, Joe, Debra and our mother all share a birthday in August. David was May and Diana delayed her birth so she was guaranteed a big party the night of her birthday, since she was born December 31st, New Year’s Eve.
No photo available at this time
TUNE 14-Debra O’s Jiggity Jig: is a 2 part 6/8 Jig I composed as a birthday gift for Debra’s birthday. However, it was also a very special occasion for Debra her younger Sister Diana and older brother Joseph and myself.

The VERY SPECIAL OCCASION was held from Friday, August 4th, 2017 through August 7th, 2017. The OCCASION was the first meeting of Diana, Debra and Joseph with their older brother Ken.

I was born and then adopted prior to our mother Doreen Lola Agnew marrying Joseph Francis MacLeod. My mother and her husband Joseph had four children David Robert MacLeod, Debra MacLeod (married name O’Connor), Joseph MacLeod and Diana MacLeod.

In December 2015, Ken found three of his four siblings’; unfortunately David Robert MacLeod had passed away in July 2014.

Ken chose to mark the occasion by composing five new 6/8 jigs. Wee Diana MacLeod being one of them. One jig for each of the children of their mother Doreen. The other four are Joey MacLeod, Debra O’s Jiggity Jig, David Robert MacLeod and Caioneach (Cináed) Brian O'Gnimh (the Irish Gaelic name of the composer).

The Agnew family are originally from County Antrim, Northern Ireland. However, the great great Grandfather James Agnew married Jessie Janet Fleming of Perthshire, Scotland. Joseph Francis MacLeod’s family is from Nova Scotia and traces back to Scotland.

So it seemed fitting to compose some pipe tunes to mark this historic and important occasion. Also, the tune is titled Debra O’s (which O’s stands for O’Connor her married name) and Jiggity Jig has a nice ring to it. Ken has spoken to Debra a few times on the phone and gets the impression if Debra was to dance a jig, it would likely be a LIVELY JIGGITY one.

Also, Ken, Joe, Debra and our mother all share a birthday in August. David was May and Diana delayed her birth so she was guaranteed a big party the night of her birthday, since she was born December 31st, New Year’s Eve.
No photo available at this time
TUNE 15-David Robert MacLeod: is a 4 part 6/8 Jig I composed as in memory of the Late David Robert MacLeod. However, it was also a very special occasion for Joe, his older Sister Debra and younger sister Diana and myself.

The VERY SPECIAL OCCASION was held from Friday, August 4th, 2017 through August 7th, 2017. The OCCASION was the first meeting of Joseph, Debra and Diana with their older brother Ken.

I was born and then adopted prior to our mother Doreen Lola Agnew marrying Joseph Francis MacLeod. My mother and her husband Joseph had four children David Robert MacLeod, Debra MacLeod (married name O’Connor), Joseph MacLeod and Diana MacLeod.

In December 2015, Ken found three of his four siblings’; unfortunately David Robert MacLeod had passed away in July 2014. So, since I was composing jigs for the other siblings I decided to compose on in memory of our late brother, whom I did not have a chance to meet. My sister Debra, indicates that in Ken’s youth, he seemed to look a lot like David, or since I was about 5 years older than David, I suppose he must have looked like Ken.

Ken chose to mark the occasion by composing five new 6/8 jigs. Joey MacLeod being one of them. One jig for each of the children of their mother Doreen. The other four are Wee Diana MacLeod, Debra O’s Jiggity Jig, David Robert MacLeod and Caioneach (Cináed) Brian O'Gnimh (the Irish Gaelic name of the composer).

The Agnew family are originally from County Antrim, Northern Ireland. However, the great great Grandfather James Agnew married Jessie Janet Fleming of Perthshire, Scotland. Joseph Francis MacLeod’s family is from Nova Scotia and traces back to Scotland.

So it seemed fitting to compose some pipe tunes to mark this historic and important occasion. Also, the family tends to call Joseph, Joey rather than Joe.

Also, Ken, Joe, Debra and our mother all share a birthday in August. David was May and Diana delayed her birth so she was guaranteed a big party the night of her birthday, since she was born December 31st, New Year’s Eve.
No photo available at this time
TUNE 16-Caioneach (Cináed) Brian O'Gnimh: is a 4 part 6/8 Jig I composed which I will explain the reason for a bit later. However, it was also a very special occasion for myself.

The VERY SPECIAL OCCASION was held from Friday, August 4th, 2017 through August 7th, 2017. The OCCASION was the first meeting of Joseph, Debra and Diana with their older brother Ken.

I was born and then adopted prior to our mother Doreen Lola Agnew marrying Joseph Francis MacLeod. My mother and her husband Joseph had four children David Robert MacLeod, Debra MacLeod (married name O’Connor), Joseph MacLeod and Diana MacLeod.

In December 2015, Ken found three of his four siblings’; unfortunately David Robert MacLeod had passed away in July 2014. So, since I was composing jigs for the other siblings I decided to compose on in memory of our late brother, whom I did not have a chance to meet. My sister Debra, indicates that in Ken’s youth, he seemed to look a lot like David, or since I was about 5 years older than David, I suppose he must have looked like Ken.

Ken chose to mark the occasion by composing five new 6/8 jigs. Joey MacLeod being one of them. One jig for each of the children of their mother Doreen. The other four are Wee Diana MacLeod, Debra O’s Jiggity Jig, David Robert MacLeod and Caioneach (Cináed) Brian O'Gnimh (the Irish Gaelic name of the composer).

The Agnew family are originally from County Antrim, Northern Ireland. However, the great great Grandfather James Agnew married Jessie Janet Fleming of Perthshire, Scotland. Joseph Francis MacLeod’s family is from Nova Scotia and traces back to Scotland.

So it seemed fitting to compose some pipe tunes to mark this historic and important occasion. So I normally would not compose a tune for myself, I decided to use the Irish Gaelic form of my birth name, Kenneth Bryan Agnew as the title as it was a very special occasions I felt I should round out the jigs by composing one for the 1st born of the five siblings. Sort of a Birthday Gift for myself I suppose.

Also, Ken, Joe, Debra and our mother all share a birthday in August. David was May and Diana delayed her birth so she was guaranteed a big party the night of her birthday, since she was born December 31st, New Year’s Eve.
No photo available at this time
TUNE 17-The Knocknasheega Jig: is a 2 part 6/8 Jig part of three 6/8 Jigs composed at the same time to be played as a set of tunes. Each tune is named after something mentioned in the Walt Disney film, “Darby O’Gill and the Little People”.

The title of this tune The March to Knocknasheega refers to a hill where the Fairy King, Brian Connor dwells with his fairies. Herminie Templeton (later Kavanagh) an American novelist wrote stories about Darby O’Gill the main character in the movie. The title of the book of stories is “Darby O’Gill and the Good People”, so Disney changed the title for the movie to “Darby O’Gill and the Little People”, mostly for the sound of the title and as we know many people in Ireland talk about not only fairies, but leprechaun’s and the wee folk or little people. So this was the first liberty taken by Disney.

However in Herminie Templeton (Kavanagh) actually called the hill after Slievenamon (Slieve-na-mon) is a mountain which is situated northwest of Carrick on Suir and northeast of Clonmel in County Tipperary, Ireland. It stands at 721 m (2,365 ft). So Disney took another liberty and changed the name of the hill/mountain in the movie to Knocknasheega. Well it does sound easier to listen to and say and a bit more Irish. Also sheega is Irish Gaelic for Fairy. The actual location of Knocknasheega is in the Knockmealdown Mountains located in the north County Tipperary and in the south County Waterford. Knocknasheega is located in the County Wexford part of the Knockmealdown Mountains, south of Clonmel and west of Waterford in the province of Munster.

In the movie the town name is Rathcullen. Again, not exactly located near the Slievenamon mountain form the book which is located north east of the Knocknasheega Mountain. Rathcullen is actually the name of a Farm or House in County Cork, not even close to where Knocknasheega is.

Knocknasheega when seen in the movie is also somewhat manufactured by special staff at Disney. There is not cairn or old ruins on the top of Knocknasheega. It is actually simply a hill or mountain without any ruins.

So, after taking some liberties with the title of the book, the name of the mountain in the book and the actual location, Disney did produce a rather wonderful and entertaining movie in “Darby O’Gill and the Little People”. It also starred some well-known British movie stars. Darby O’Gill was played by Albert Sharpe, an Ulsterman, born in Belfast Northern Ireland also known for his role as Albert Campbell in Brigadoon alongside Gene Kelly and Van Johnson and Cyd Charisse and James Ashmond in Royal Wedding with Fred Astaire and Jane Powell. Darby O’Gill’s daughter Katie was played by at Walt Disney Studio staple actor Janet Munro who was born in Blackpool, Lancashire, England. She started in a number of Disney movies including Third Man on the Mountain and Swiss Family Robinson as well Darby O’Gill and the Little People. Jimmy O’Shea who was born in Dublin starred as King Brian Connor the King of the Little People (fairies and leprechauns). Also the movie featured Estelle Winwood who was born in Lee, Kent, England and made her acting debut at the age of 5 and who would become the oldest living working actor at 97 when she played her last role in the television series Quincy M.E. and she died at 101 years of age in 1984. She played Sheelah Sugrue the meddlesome busy body and gossip the mother of the town bully Pony Sugrue played by Kieron Moore who was born in County Cork, Ireland. Also, it stared a relatively new comer was Sean Connery who though given an Irish name was actually born in Edinburgh, Scotland and he who would go on to become the first 007 James Bond and become a well-known and respected movie actor. He was 29 when he played Michael McBride in Darby O’Gill and the Little People.

So the tune title “The March to Knocknasheega” is actually named after the fictional mountain from the movie.
TUNE 18-Chasing the Banshee: is a 4 part 6/8 Jig part of three 6/8 Jigs composed at the same time to be played as a set of tunes. Each tune is named after something mentioned in the Walt Disney film, “Darby O’Gill and the Little People”.

The title of this tune Chasing the Banshee which refers to the Banshee which a special effect in the movie. The Banshee put’s the come-hiller on Darby O’Gill’s daughter Katie. However, Darby had captured the King of the Leprechaun’s King Brian Connor himself and was given 3 wishes. Darby eventually used up the three wishes, but King Brian Connor took pity on Darby and said he could have one more wish and Darby wished for the Banshee to put the come-hither on him rather than his daughter Katie, which the Banshee did. The King Brian Connor told Darby that he tricked him by allowing him to believe he could have a fourth wish as only three wishes were allowed so all of his wishes would then not be granted. However, it was in order save Darby from the Banshee’s come-hither that King Brian Connor deceived Darby, but he also did not have to part with any of the other items he granted in Darby’s three original wishes.

In the movie Darby’s first wish after capturing King Brian Connor by having a drinking contest with him and keeping the King of the Leprechaun’s with him until daybreak (Leprechauns are powerless on humans during the day), wished that King Brian Connor would stay with him for the next two weeks until he makes his final two wishes.

Darby’s second wish was for his daughter Katie (played by Janet Munro) and the new caretaker Michael McBride (played by Sean Connery) to have a happy marriage.

Darby’s third wish came about after his daughter fell ill and was with fever and a Banshee appeared to take her sole to the otherworld. Darby however got his daughter home after fighting off the Banshee, but the Banshee summoned the Death Carriage (Cóiste Bodha) to take her. That’s when Darby made his third wish that he go in his daughter Katie’s place. King Brian Connor reluctantly granted Darby’s wish. Darby was one of King Brian Connor’s favourite local’s as he always spoke highly of him and the Leprechauns and was a great believed in them.

But while accompanying Darby on his way to the next world, King Brian tricks Darby into making a fourth wish ("wishing" that his friend could join him in the afterlife). Because he is only allowed three wishes, this negates all the previous wishes (except, somehow, the wish that the coach come for him instead of Katie) and spares Darby's life. Darby is saved and King Brian has (literally) the last laugh in their running battle of wits.

Even though the story ends, it is suggested that Darby’s daughter Katie and Michael McBride the new caretaker would marry and live happily ever-after, likely with Katie’s drinking, story-telling, scoundrel of a father along for part of the married life.

So, I named the tune Chasing the Banshee which is what Darby was trying to do, Chase the Banshee from his presence.




TUNE 19-Escaping the Cóiste Bodha : is a 2 part 6/8 Jig part of three 6/8 Jigs composed at the same time to be played as a set of tunes. Each tune is named after something mentioned in the Walt Disney film, “Darby O’Gill and the Little People”.

The title of this tune The Last Cóiste Bodha refers to the Death Coach in the film. The term Cóiste Bodha is Gaelic for Death Coach. In today’s society in North America it is known as a Funeral Coach or Hearse.

In the movie after Darby’s daughter takes ill and is near death the Banshee appears to take her soul to the otherworld. However Darby fights off the Banshee and manages to get his daughter Katie back home. The Banshee then reappears and call for the Cóiste Bodha (Death Coach) which appears with its horses and driver. After the Banshee put’s the come-hiller on Darby O’Gill’s daughter Katie for the second time, Darby uses his third wish granted to him after he captured the King of the Leprechaun’s King Brian Connor himself and was given 3 wishes. Darby eventually used up the three wishes. Then King Brian Connor took pity on Darby and said he could have one more wish and Darby wished for the Banshee to put the come-hither on him rather than his daughter Katie, which the Banshee did. The King Brian Connor told Darby that he tricked him by allowing him to believe he could have a fourth wish as only three wishes were allowed so all of his wishes would then not be granted. However, it was in order save Darby from the Banshee’s come-hither that King Brian Connor deceived Darby, but he also did not have to part with any of the other items he granted in Darby’s three original wishes.

In the movie Darby’s first wish after capturing King Brian Connor by having a drinking contest with him and keeping the King of the Leprechaun’s with him until daybreak (Leprechauns are powerless on humans during the day), wished that King Brian Connor would stay with him for the next two weeks until he makes his final two wishes.

Darby’s second wish was for his daughter Katie (played by Janet Munro) and the new caretaker Michael McBride (played by Sean Connery) to have a happy marriage.

Darby’s third wish came about after his daughter fell ill and was with fever and a Banshee appeared to take her sole to the otherworld. Darby however got his daughter home after fighting off the Banshee, but the Banshee summoned the Death Carriage (Cóiste Bodha) to take her. That’s when Darby made his third wish that he go in his daughter Katie’s place. King Brian Connor reluctantly granted Darby’s wish. Darby was one of King Brian Connor’s favourite local’s as he always spoke highly of him and the Leprechauns and was a great believed in them.

But while accompanying Darby on his way to the next world, King Brian tricks Darby into making a fourth wish ("wishing" that his friend could join him in the afterlife). Because he is only allowed three wishes, this negates all the previous wishes (except, somehow, the wish that the coach come for him instead of Katie) and spares Darby's life. Darby is saved and King Brian has (literally) the last laugh in their running battle of wits.

Even though the story ends, it is suggested that Darby’s daughter Katie and Michael McBride the new caretaker would marry and live happily ever-after, likely with Katie’s drinking, story-telling, scoundrel of a father along for part of the married life.

So, I named the tune The Cóiste Bodha (Death Coach) in recognition of the part this played in the plot and story line of the movie. The tune has a bit of a trotting style in the first part and a coming to the end of its travel in the second part with the run’s down the scale.



TUNE 20-The Shillelagh Knockabout: is a 6 part 2/4 Hornpipe. A Shillelagh is an Irish walking stick also used as a club for protection made of the wood from a Blackthorn Bush.

The tune was written to suggest the use of the Shillelagh when walking in a rough and sort of a slap-stick manner and even giving a wee knock on someone’s head with you Shillelagh if they were to bother you during your stroll.

The use of the “G Grace Note Grip” on “B” in various parts of the tune’s tempo and pace would be the Knock with the Shillelagh.

It’s tempo also suggest that the person walking was in a bit of a hurry and because the tune has 6 parts, it appears he was going a bit of a distance and it was up and down hills on the streets or countryside roadways or foot paths.

As part of my heritage and ethnicity is from Northern Ireland which comes from the Agnew’s on my mother’s side, this is one of several tunes with an Irish flavour or title I have written over the years. Other tunes of course reflect my Scottish heritage and ethnicity from my connection to the Fleming and Stewart families of Perthshire, Scotland on my mother’s side and the Morrison family from the Hebrides area of Scotland on my father’s side.




TUNE 21-Michael Grey, Just Getting Warmed Up: is a 4 part 2/4 Hornpipe. I composed this tune as a birthday gift for an old friend, band mate and extremely accomplished and world class competitor, Mike Grey. I first met Mike when he became a member of the 48th Highlanders of Canada Pipes and Drums, the band I was currently playing with. His first instructor was George Walker also a member of the 48th Highlanders of Canada Pipes and drums, so it was natural for George to bring one of his students into the band. Most of us knew that Mike was destined for bigger things and Mike has gone on to do just that. It is a privilege to know Mike and to be able to call him a friend. As the tune indicates, Mike is JUST GETTING WARMED UP, I am sure there are more accomplishments in his future.
TUNE 22-Invictus Spiritu (Undefeated or Unconquered Spirit): is a 2 part 18/8 Slow Air written in an unusual time signature and tempo reflective of the unusual participants in the Invictus Games, Wounded Warriors with Undefeated and Unconquered Spirit.

I had heard of the Invictus Games in the past. I myself has served as a Solider, Piper and Pipe Major with the Canadian Forces in three units in the Toronto area. I know one of the competitors who I served with during my final years with the Canadian Forces, Cpl. Kelly Scanlan who was a member of the Toronto Scottish Regiment (The Queen Mother’s Own Regiment) within the 32nd Canadian Brigade of the 4th Canadian Division who had deployed and served in Afghanistan. All though I was never found myself to be in direct harms-way over the years from 1963 to 2014, I understand the Spirit of the Canadian and all Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines, Guardsmen and Cadets through the commonwealth countries and other allied nations throughout the world.

This spirit of comradery and a brother and sisterhood of men and women of the various Army, Navy, Airforce, Marines, Coast Guard, Militia, Reserve and Cadet Units throughout the world continues to survive within those who have been wounded both physically and emotionally through their service to their fellow man and country. This to me was most evident in the past weeks Invictus Games 2017 held in Toronto, Ontario Canada from the arrival, opening ceremonies, the competitions, the awards and the closing ceremonies, from September 23rd to September 30th, 2017.

What a glorious Seven Days of watching the Invictus Spiritu (Undefeated or Unconquered Spirit) of those who participate, those family members and friends who support the wounded warriors of these games and those who supported them as volunteers and those who simply supported them by attending the games to cheer them on.

These wounded warriors with the Invictus Spiritu (Undefeated or Unconquered Spirit) overcame their physical and emotional struggles in life to become participants in the Invictus Games and wear the flag of their country on their chest once again to in competition representing their country. Simply by beginning their journey to succeed in becoming a competitor in the Invictus Games made them a champion in life and a winner at the starting line.

As I sometimes say, it is not important about who were are when we are born, or who we are at the end of our life, it is the path or journey we take and what we make of our lives with the time we have. Well, it is also said of the Invictus Games competitors, they are winners, simply by making it to the starting line. The competition and the final results are not as important as the ability to make it to the starting line or to commence the competition. But it must be very rewarding to the wound warriors with their undefeated spirit to be able to compete not only in their sport, and in many cases, their multiple sporting events.

It must be said “WELL DONE to ONE AND ALL” let the Invictus Spiritu (Undefeated or Unconquered Spirit) continue in your lives and become alive and working in other wounded warriors who take up the challenge to participate in future Invictus Games and possibly the rest of us that witnessed this Seven Days of Glory may be challenged in our own lives to get that same Invictus Spiritu (Undefeated or Unconquered Spirit) in our own lives in whatever we do or challenges we may face.
Invictus Games 2017 Toronto Opening Ceremonies 48th Highlanders of Canada and RCAF Pipes and Drums
Opening Ceremonies of 2017 Invictus Games - Toronto with 48th Highlanders of Canada and the RCAF Pipes and Drums performing
Opening Ceremonies of 2017 Invictus Games - Toronto with 48th Highlanders of Canada and the RCAF Pipes and Drums performing
Cpl. Kelly Scanlan, Toronto Scottish Regiment - Kelly Scanlan quoted "I'm not really competing against other teams, I'm competing against the me of one year ago. I'm competing against the me that was struggling," Scanlan said.
She says she's determined to defeat the person she once was.
"I look forward to kicking her butt," she said.
On the Left, Kelly's mother and on the right Cpl. Kelly Scanlan
Cpl. (Ret'd) Kelly Scanlan win's gold for Swinning.
Invictus Games 2017 Toronto - Volunteers
Pipe Major MWO Al Clark CD, Ceremonial Guard and 48th Highlanders of Canada Pipes and Drums and Central Command Band perform at the Opening of the Closing Ceremonies of the 2017 Invictus Games - Toronto - Pipe Major Clark Composed the tune for the 150th Celebration of Canada title Strong and Free and it was felt the tune was a good tribute to the wounded warriors that took part in the games. Al Clark was the solo piper playing at the start of the opening ceremonies.
TUNE 23-Marilyn Willis: is a 4 part 6/8 March I composed as in recognition of Marilyn’s service with the 48th Highlanders of Canada Pipes and Drums as well as her career as a Piper. Marilyn also played with the Guelph Pipe Band when it was under the direction of Pipe Major Ed Neigh in Grade 1 competition.

I first met Marilyn after she joined the 48th Highlanders when I was attending one of the 48th Highlanders Pipes and Drums Association annual Wine and Cheese Parties. Though I did not know Marilyn when she played with the Guelph Pipe Band, I likely came across her in those day, when I was playing with the 48th Highlanders Pipes and Drums Grade 1 competition band at various highland games.

Thought I never had the opportunity to play in the same band as Marilyn, I did have an opportunity of playing with her during when she was with the 48th Highlanders and I was Pipe Major of the Toronto Scottish Pipes and Drums, when our bands would be participating in various events as combine massed Pipes and Drums.

I has always been a pleasure when in the company of Marilyn over the years and I am sure that it will continue from time to time in the future.
Piper Marilyn Willis - 48th Highlanders Pipes and Drums during one of the St. Andrew's Ball events in Toronto.
Leading Jim McGillvary, followed by Ryan Domjancic, Marilyn Willis and Dylan Whitemore - Drummer John Bridge shown as 2nd drummer in the Mirror.
Photo of Guelph Pipe Band from the mid 1970's with Marilyn Willis bottom front left corner of the photo with Ellen Mole on her right just behind her and John Bridge to the right behind Ellen Mole - Jim Stewart on Bass and to the extreme right Geoff Neigh.
TUNE 24-Pipe Major Andrew Killick: is a 4 part 2/4 Hornpipe I composed as in recognition of Andrew’s appointment at Pipe Major of The Toronto Scottish Regiment (Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother’s Own) Pipes and Drums.

I first met Andrew when we met to discuss is transfer from the Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa Pipes and Drums to one of the regiments in the Toronto area. I was Pipe Major of the Toronto Scottish at that period of time and recommended he consider a transfer to the Toronto Scottish rather than the Lorne Scots of Brampton or the other Toronto regiments the 48th Highlanders of Canada. At the time I indicated that both the Loren Scots and the 48th Highlanders were fine regiments and that I myself was a member of the 48th Highlanders Pipes and Drums in my early career as a piper. However, I mentioned also, that the Toronto Scottish Regiment’s Pipes and Drums was in a rebuilding mode and that there was ample opportunity for promotion from his rank of Corporal to a higher rank as we had openings for promotion within the band. While pointing out that the Lorne Scots and 48th Highlanders had less opportunity of promotion as their rank slots were already filled.

Andrew decided to transfer to the Toronto Scottish. Also, another member of the Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa, Corporal Billy Boulet-Gagnon met with me shortly after that and also decided to join the Toronto Scottish.

Andrew had previously played for the Glengarry Pipe Band in Grade 2 and also with the Ceremonial Guard Pipe Band in Ottawa.

While I was still Pipe Major of the Toronto Scottish I was able to get Andrew promoted from Corporal to Master Corporal with intentions of getting him promoted to Sergeant then hopefully to the rank of a Warrant or Master Warrant Officer. Andrew was in my mind a good candidate to be groomed for the future role of Pipe Major of the Toronto Scottish. I also, had one of his band mates Billy Boulet-Gagnon who transferred to the band take some piping courses as well as the Drum Major’s course with the Canadian Forces, thinking since Billy also not only a proficient Piper, but also a proficient Side Drummer and also played other musical instruments, like myself. I though Billy would make a good candidate to be groomed to become a future Drum Major of The Toronto Scottish.

So, I was pleasantly surprised to see that both Andrew and Billy both were appointed to the roles I envisioned for them with the band, as Pipe Major and Drum Major at the same time. These two young men I am sure will move the band forward under their direction.

This tune as stated was composed to honour Andrew. I had already composed a 4 Part 6/8 March named after Billy a couple of years ago. I was simply waiting for Andrew to eventually be appointed a Pipe Major before composing this particular hornpipe. I recall that Andrew liked playing hornpipes and jigs and did comment favourable on a few of my other compositions that he had heard and enjoyed.

I hope to eventually get down to the band rooms some evening to congratulate Andrew and Billy both in person on their appointments. Unfortunately, I currently teach some piping students on Thursday evenings when the band practices. However, maybe I will be able to take one night off to make a trip to the armory in the next few weeks.
Pipe Major Sgt. Andrew Killick - Toronto Scottish Regiment (Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother's Own) Pipes and Drums - Remembrance Day Services - November 11, 2017
Cpl. Andrew Killick on left, next to Pipe Major Kenneth B. Bice CD with Drum Major Steve Hepburn in front.
Left to Right: Sgt. Andrew Killick new Pipe Major of the Toronto Scottish Regiment - two pipers Connor Elliott and Dave Chandler both pipers with the Toronto Scottish Regiment tasked to and wearing the Ceremonial Guard Piper's uniform and Cpl. Billy Boulet-Gagnon New Drum Major of The Toronto Scottish Regiment - Photo of 4 Toronto Scottish Regimental Pipers at Fortissimo Tattoo July 2017-Parliment Hill Ottawa, Ontario
TUNE 25-Beverley Wayne Agnew: is a 4 part 6/8 March I composed as a gift for my mother Doreen’s youngest brother Beverly’s birthday.

I was placed into a guardianship with the Bice family of Mimico shortly after I was born by my mother Doreen Lola Agnew of Dundalk, Ontario. The Bice family eventually adopted me when I was 19 and primarily because I required a birth certificate to travel overseas with the Canadian Forces. They wanted to ensure that my name showed BICE and not my birth surname AGNEW.

In 2015 I started to research my Agnew family roots and received my birth registration, found my mother’s grave and an obituary of the man she eventually married. I even through shear chance or luck, as I was not looking for them, but I found 3 of my four siblings that were still living. One of my brothers passed away in 2014. My mother married Joseph Francis MacLeod and had four more children after I was born. My brother David who passed away in 2014, my sister Debra another brother Joseph and my youngest sister Dianna. We finally all met for the first time in August 2017.

At that meeting, I also met a 1st cousin Sharyn and her husband, as well as one of my aunt’s Islay. Also at that meeting were Bev and his wife Pat.

I had met Bev many years ago. In fact, my mother Doreen used to babysit me and would visit my adopted parents to find out how I was doing over the years. Unfortunately my mother died 31 Oct 1965 at 34 years of age. My adopted parents also took me to visit my grandparents farm in Dundalk, Ontario and that is when I first me Beverley. Bev is about 9 months older than me. We used to play together and even do some of the farm chores when I would visit my grandparents. However, Bev and I had not seen each other in over 40 years until we recently met.

At the time of the meeting with my aunt Islay and my sisters Debra and Diana and my brother Joseph, I gave each of them a gift as well as a framed copy of a pipe tune that I composed for each of them. All were 6/8 Jigs. There was Islay’s Jig, Debra O’s Jiggity Jig, Wee Diana MacLeod and Joey MacLeod. Debra O’ is short form of my sister’s married name Debra O’Connor. I also composed a 6/8 jig for my late brother titled David Robert MacLeod. I hope to present it to his wife some day in the future.

I am planning to present a framed copy of this tune to my uncle when he celebrates his birthday this coming December 17th or about that time, along with an additional wee gift for Christmas as well. I hope to be meeting one of my other aunts, Shirley who I have not met yet, that lives in Apsley, Ontario with her husband.

Since finding some of my family on my mother’s side, I have also discovered that my biological father was a Morrison from Scottish Roots in the area of the Isle of Islay, Scotland in the southern Hebrides. I have found his grave as well as one of his brothers and one of his sister and her husband buried in York Cemetery in Toronto. One of his other sisters is buried in Glen Oaks Memorial Gardens in Oakville. Of the two brothers it is my belief that Archie Donald Morrison is my biological father rather than his brother William Angus Morrison who is 10 years older than Archie. I discovered my connection to the Morrison family through DNA testing when a 1st cousin match came up. Since I knew my biological mother, this match was to my biological father’s family.

So, maybe in the coming year I will compose a few tunes after some of the Morrison’s.
No photo available at this time
TUNE 26-The Agnew-Morrison Waltz: is a 2 part 6/8 Waltz I composed to recognize my two biological families. My mother’s family the Agnew’s for County Antrim, Northern Ireland and my father’s family the Morrison’s of the Western Isles of Scotland in the Hebrides. My mother, Doreen Lola Agnew’s family descends originally from my great great grandfather James Agnew of County Antrim, Northern Ireland and my great great grandmother Jessie Fleming the daughter of Alexander Fleming and Jean Stewart of Perthshire Scotland. My father’s family descend from my great grandfather Neil Morrison of Scotland and his wife Sarah Minnie McPhee of the Isle of Islay (Bowesmore) Scotland.

My mother Doreen never married my biological father, who I have traced to being Archibald (Archie) Donald Morrison through DNA testing and tracing the Morrison family after I had a match with a 1st Cousin using DNA testing. This was done through tracing the Morrison family history and my 1st cousin’s uncles, as I knew who my biological mother was it would have to be one of her uncles. Based on age and location, Archie was the most likely to be my biological father. Though he did have a brother who was 10 years older in the area as well, it made more sense that a man of 24 or 25 rather than 35-36 years of age would have met my 17 year old mother. Also a primary school friend whose wife and mother-in-law came from the same town (Dundalk, Ontario) that my mother’s family was from and knew my mother, she did mention that my father was likely one of two brothers and one was named Archie. Some of the information she provided proved in accurate, but the name Archie may some further proof that Archie Donald Morrison is indeed my biological father.

I know my mother went back to the farm in Dundalk prior to my birth. I also was told she never told anyone in the family who my father was, but she may have to my primary schools friends’ mother-in-law as they were good friends growing up. She may not have indicated the last names of the brothers only their first names. I think that might be because she did not want anyone to know his full name and likely this was so no one would find him and tell him my mother was pregnant. I do not believe my mother told my biological father she was pregnant. I don’t believe she wanted to marry him either for whatever reason. Anyway, the proof that Archie Donald Morrison is my biological father is very strong.

So, I composed this waltz to honour both my biological mother and biological father and their two families the Agnew’s and the Morrison’s. I composed another waltz a couple of years ago titled The Agnew-MacLeod waltz to recognize my mother’s marriage to her one and only husband Joseph Francis MacLeod. So now I have composed two waltzes’ to recognize my heritage and connection to the Agnew and Morrison and Agnew and MacLeod families through my biological mother.

I suppose I could have called the tune Archie and Doreen’s Waltz, but The Agnew-Morrison Waltz seems to be a better title.
No photo available at this time
TUNE 27-Fred’s Electrified Piping: is a 4 part 9/8 Slip Jig I composed to recognize my old friend Fred Hodgson’s transformation from the Great Highland Bagpipe to an Electronic form of Bagpipes. Thus, Fred’s Electrified Piping came about.

I have known Fred and his wife Linda for many years. Fred and I were pipers with the 48th Highlanders of Canada Pipes and Drums for many years. Fred was one of the pipers at our wedding and Linda was one of Margaret’s bride’s maids.

Fred from what I understand was advised by his doctor to avoid playing his great highland bagpipe due to some form of eye condition. So, not one to stop piping, Fred acquired a set of electronic bagpipes which required not blowing, simply good fingering and playing skills, which Fred definitely has.

Fred and Linda decided to head east to where Celtic Music is still understood and played in the traditional fashion. The have settled and lived in Cheti Camp, on the North West Coast of Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. I know that Fred and Linda attend some of the Kitchen Parties were folks from the area get together to celebrate and play Celtic and some Acadian music based on the ancestral roots of those in the area, that of Scottish and Acadian’s. Acadian’s are descendants of the French Colonist of the New World and settled in the Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, PEI and Quebec areas of Canada and some areas in the United States. They primarily spoke French. They also mixed with the Indigenous people of the area. Some of the Courier Du Bois would have been Acadians, as well as those of Scottish and Irish and Metis.

Though I have passed through Cheti Camp many years ago with my wife Margaret when we vacationed in the Maritimes, hopefully in the near future, Maggie and I will make another trip to the East Coast and visit with Fred and Linda in Cheti Camp and also visit with one of my brother’s and one of my sisters who both live in Nova Scotia.

Fred and Linda have invited Maggie and I to visit and would like to have us take a trip over to Newfoundland with them which would be one of the few places in Canada we have not been to in our travels. So we are looking forward to planning a trip down east in the near future.
Fred Hodgson (circled) with from left to right - Don Pringle, George Walker and Sandy Dewar of the 48th Highlanders of Canada Pipes and Drums during a Robbie Burns Dinner Address to the Haggis Presentation.




TUNE 28 Lament for Innocent Victims: is a 2 part 8/8 Lament I composed on April 24th, 2018 the afternoon after the deadly Van rampage that occurred at lunch time the day before along a stretch of Yonge Street, from Finch Avenue to south of Sheppard Ave.

Tragically 10 Innocent Victims of this rampage lost their lives while 16 others were injured, some critically. They were men and women, young and old, of various backgrounds. The lone driver was eventually arrested by a lone Toronto Police officer who was taunted by the driver of the Van to shoot and kill him. The officer recognized the problem and arrested the man without the use of his weapon.

Toronto citizens came together to mourn. They are creating a memorial to those who lost their lives and those injured in this, the deadliest vehicle ramming attack in Canadian history at the site of the location where they all gathered to mourn the lost. The city and country came together once again, only a few weeks after the deadly bus crash that killed a number of the Humboldt Bronco’s hockey team and their coach. Not only did these two tragic loses of innocent lives bring the country together but drew attention and mourning from many parts of the world.

This lament is primarily to pay respect to those who lost their lives in the Toronto incident, but also for those who are Innocent Victims of violence and terrorism, who leave for work or day or relaxation in the morning and to be lost to their families and friends and the world for simply being in the wrong place at the wrong time so to speak. They are Innocent Victims that someone or a group of people or terrorists target.

This won’t be the last, and it wasn’t. After composing this tune, another attach on Innocent Victims on the Danforth in Toronto occurred only a couple of months later where a Gunman randomly shot and killed two young women and wounded others. In other parts of the world this also continues and most recently in London, England where a Van rammed through a crowed area in front of the Parliament buildings this week as I was preparing to post this to my web site. We all hope someday violence will end, war will end and peace will become the new normal here on earth.






TUNE 29 Prince Louis’ March: is a 4 part 2/4 march I composed to recognized the third child born to the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Prince Louis Arthur Charles Mountbatten of Cambridge. I have previously composed a 2/4 march for bother of Prince Louis’ siblings, Prince George, titled The Young Windsor and Princess Charlotte, titled Princess Charlotte’s Welcome. I simply titled this tune Prince Louis’ March.



TUNE 30 Harry’s Wedding: is a 4 part 2/4 march I composed to recognize the marriage of Prince Henry Charles Albert David Mountbatten Windsor to American Rachel Meghan Markel. The couple are known as the Duke and Duchess of Sussex.

This was likely to be one of the last major Royal weddings we will see for some time, at least on this scale. It was a historic occasion in some sense. One of Prince Harry’s ancestor’s Kind Edward abdicated the thrown to marry an American Divorce Wallis Simpson. Prince Harry as his is most widely known, also married an American Divorce.

The historical significance also included those included on the guest list, many American movie stars and television stars, including many of the case of Suits a television series that was filmed in Toronto and The Duchess of Sussex was an integral character in the show. Also, Meghan’s parents were a mixed race and her mother was of African descent. However, this was also not something that new. Queen Charlotte wife of King George III of England is said to have had African heritage in her roots as well through her relations who were German and Portuguese and they were from a Moor African line. But this is not proven nor a well-known fact, so the current wedding is more of a modern historical coming together of two people of difference races and faiths, though Meghan a Roman Catholic did convert to become a member of the Church of England before she married Prince Harry.

The other historical notes are the Speaker a Reverend from the Episcopalian Church in North America, gave a rather rousing homily / sermon about love, something not normally witnessed in the Church of England. Also, some gospel hymn by an English Choir primarily made up of English men and women that have Africa roots and a solo Cello played also by a young 19 year old English student also that has African roots were spectacular and something new for Royal Weddings in England.

There was also a Canadian Connection. Meghan Markel lived in Toronto while filming the television series Suits and also include the children of Ben Mulroney also a Television Celebrity and son of former Prime Minister Brian Mulroney. So, this was possibly also something historic, having children in the wedding party from another country.

So yes, this Royal Wedding was somewhat historical as all Royal Weddings are, with some definite defining elements to make this one even more historical.












TUNE 31 Waltzing Across Isaly: is a 2 part 6/8 Waltz I composed to recognize the Isle of Islay in the southern Hebrides in the area of Argyll and Bute, Scotland.

My great grandparents Neil Morrison was born in 1821 in this area of Scotland and his wife Sarah Minnie McPhee who was born in 1837 in Bowmore. The Morrison and McPhee families immigrated in the mid 1800’s to Canada and settled in the Sydenham, Grey, Ontario area.

After they married and their children were born (all born in Sydenham, Grey, Ontario) Neil, his wife Sarah and children including my grandfather Malcolm Morrison relocated to Strathclair, Manitoba Canada about 1881-1882.

My grandfather Malcolm Morrison was married twice. He remarried after his first wife passed away in 1910 to a woman from Belfast, Northern Ireland, named Lillian Crawford. With Lillian he had another five sons and two daughters. Of the five sons, my father was Archibald Donald Morrison, who was born in Strathclair, MB in 1923 and after serving with the Lord Strathcona Horse Regiment during WWII he went to Toronto, Ontario to live with his brother William Angus Morrison and his two sisters Lillian and Sarah who all had move to Toronto from Strathclair, MB.

My father Archie and my mother Doreen Lola Agnew never married and I do not know the reason for that. My mother Doreen died at 34 on October 31, 1965 in the Toronto area and my father Archie died on January 12, 1975 at the age of 52. So, my Morrison and McPhee roots are from Islay while my mother’s family the Agnew’s roots are from County Antrim, Northern Ireland and the Flemings and Stewarts from Perthshire, Scotland.


























Tune 32 Pipe Major Alan B. Clark CD (a.k.a. Aielan Mac A Clerich): is a 4 part 2/4 Hornpipe I composed. The a.k.a. part of the title is the Gaelic form of Alan B. Clark’s name. The tune is both a Birthday Gift to Alan whose birthday is August 16th, and I composed this tune his birthday in 2018. However it is also to recognize our relations ship as distant cousins. Both Alan and I have been researching our respective family’s roots and building family trees.

In my case I was also trying to discover my paternal family surname as I was adopted and DNA testing was the only method that might help. It did and I discovered a 1st Cousin match on my paternal side which after more research lead me to determining that Archibald Donald Morrison is my biological father.

Alan had also taken several DNA tests and uploaded his tests results to various sites to match with others. It was when I was checking a DNA match with a woman from Australian that I noticed the name Alan B. Clark as a DNA match. This in itself did not catch my attention, though I knew an Alan Clark. But the e-mail address associated with the DNA match did. It read began with Pmaj followed by the name and e-mail web site host id. Well Pmaj is a short form for Pipe Major and one that hold an appointment as Pipe Major is a bagpiper and often with the military or a civilian pipe band.

I knew an Alan B. Clark who was originally a piper with the Essex Scottish and then became Pipe Major of the Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa and was currently the Pipe Major of the Canadian Forces Ceremonial Guard in Ottawa. So, this was a big surprise to me and after I contacted Alan to him also. We have known each other as Pipe Majors of various Canadian Forces Army Pipe Bands and never knew we were related.

You never know who you may know that is related to you, but if you take a DNA test you sometimes get surprises, hopefully all pleasant.
















Tune 33 Cpl. Harry Hodgson CD: is a 4 part 6/8 March I composed for one of the several members of the Hodgson family who served as pipers with the 48th Highlanders of Canada Pipes and Drums. I provided Harry with a copy of this in order to celebrate his 83rd birthday, on December 17th, 2018. Harry and his brother Warrant Officer Fred Hodgson were pipers in the 48th Highlanders during the years I was a piper with the band. Harry and I have been friends for a many years, having met Harry in 1963 when I joined the regiment as a piper. His brother Fred and I also have been good friends over the years and Fred was one of the two pipers at my wife Maggie and my wedding. Fred’s wife was one of Maggie’s bridesmaids. In recent years I have been honoured to have been able to assist the Hodgson family in my role as a member of the Clergy by officiating one of Fred’s son’s weddings (Patrick) and will be officiating one of his other sons (Andrew) weddings this coming September 2019. I also conducted a memorial service for Harry and Fred’s brother Josh Hodgson’s wife’s funeral earlier this year in 2018. I compose a tune for his brother Fred Hodgson which is a 9/8 Slip Jig titled “Fred’s Electrified Piping” which is tune number 27 of the new compositions.

Harry was also the piper who took over the teaching of pipes to members of the 48th Highlanders Cadet Corps. That corps was originally started by Major Brown one of the officers of the regiment and was the Captain of one of the companies I was the Company Piper for. He asked me if I would help start a cadet pipe band and instruct some young people for around the area of Moss Park Armory in piping. We started this and when I left the Pipes and Drums and regiment, Harry at some point resurrected the teaching of cadets to be pipers. Some of the current members of the regimental pipes and drums were some of Harry’s students. He is well loved and appreciated by those he taught to play the pipes over the years.

Harry is one of those quite men, a true gentleman and wonderful person to meet and to be able to call a friend. I am fortunate to fall in to that category to be able call Harry a friend.
Photo of Harry in his 48th Highlanders Pipes and Drum Blazer


Harry Hodgson the CNE Warriors Day Council Piper on the left.

Harry Hodgson see red circle - he is 2nd row - from 1957 48th Highlanders of Canada Pipes and Drums Band Photo at Camp Niagara-on-the-Lake